Tags: Aspergillosis

Fusarium, Penicillium, Paracoccidioides, & Agents of Chromomycosis

Fusarium spp. is an emerging fungal pathogen. Although long recognized as a cause of local infection involving nails, traumatized skin, or the cornea (eg, in contact lens wearers), deep or disseminated infection was not described until the mid 1970s. Despite its worldwide distribution and its frequent recovery from soil and vegetative material, infection is quite rare. Only ~ 100 cases involving invasive disease in immunosuppressed patients have been described in the medical literature.

Aspergillus, Pseudallescheria, & Agents of Mucormycosis

Aspergillus spp. are found worldwide and grow in a variety of conditions. They commonly grow in soil and moist locations and are among the most common molds encountered on spoiled food and decaying vegetation, in compost piles, and in stored hay and grain. Aspergillus spp. often grow in houseplant soil, and such soil may be a source of Aspergillus conidia or spores in the home, office, or hospital setting. The airborne conidia are extremely heat resistant and can withstand extreme environmental conditions.

Mucormycosis: Clinical Syndromes

Rhinocerebral mucormycosis occurs most commonly in patients with uncontrolled diabetes, especially after an episode of diabetic ketoacidosis. It may also occur in leukemic patients who have had prolonged neutropenia and therapy with broad-spectrum antibiotics and occasionally in organ transplant recipients. The earliest symptoms in rhinocerebral mucormycosis are facial pain, headache, and nasal stuffiness.

Aspergillus Sinusitis

Aspergillus spp. are capable of causing a variety of infections involving the paranasal sinuses (Table 2). Although uncommon, Aspergillus sinusitis is related to the immune status and immunologic response of the host. In the severely immunosuppressed or neutropenic patient, Aspergillus sinusitis or rhinosinusitis may occur. Symptoms include headache, toothache, nasal congestion, purulent nasal discharge, and sinus or eye pain.

Use and Administration of Itraconazole 100 mg (Sporanox)

Itraconazole can be used to treat various superficial fungal infections, including the dermatophytoses, pityriasis versicolor, and mucosal and cutaneous forms of candidosis. It is also effective in patients with subcutaneous infections, such as chromoblastomycosis, sporotrichosis and certain forms of phaeohyphomycosis.

Fluconazole 50, 100, 150, 200 mg Tablets (Diflucan)

Fluconazole is a potent inhibitor of ergosterol biosynthesis, through its action on the cytochrome P-450-dependent enzyme, lanosterol 14a-demethylase. Depletion of ergosterol, the principal sterol in the membrane of susceptible fungal cells, and accumulation of methylated sterols leads to alterations in a number of membrane-associated cell functions. Fluconazole has a broad spectrum of action including Blastomyces dermatitidis, Coccidioides immitis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Histoplasma capsulatum and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. It is active against Candida albicans, C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis, but many strains of C. krusei and Torulopsis glabrata (now reclassified as Candida glabrata) appear to be insensitive.

Buy Without Prescription Sporanox (Itraconazole) 100mg

Itraconazole is a triazole antifungal drug. It is used orally to treat oropharyngeal and vulvovaginal candidiasis, pityriasis versicolor, dermatophytoses unresponsive to topical treatment, and systemic infections, including aspergillosis, blastomycosis, chromoblastomycosis, cocci-dioidomycosis, cryptococcosis, histoplasmosis, paracocci-dioidomycosis, and sporotrichosis.