Tags: Zagam

Antimicrobial therapy: general principles

A wide variety of antimicrobial agents is available to treat established infections caused by bacteria, fungi, viruses, or parasites. This section will cover the general principles of antimicrobial therapy and will also include illustrative clinical problems to emphasize proper decision-making in using antimicrobials.

Fluoroquinolones: Levofloxacin, Moxifloxacin, Gatifloxacin

Earlier generations of fluoroquinolones (e.g., ofloxacin) had limited activity against some respiratory pathogens, such as S. pneumoniae. However, recent fluoroquinolone agents (so-called third-generation agents, or the “respiratory fluoroquinolones”) are active against a broad spectrum of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, including atypical organisms. Therefore, they are highly effective in RTIs.

Fluoroquinolones

Fluoroquinolones are broad-spectrum antibacterials that have experienced an upsurge in use in recent years. Because of their broad-spectrum activity, high efficacy, favorable dosing, and availability in oral and IV form, these agents are indicated for a range of bacterial infections, including respiratory, GI, and urinary tract infections. Earlier generations of fluoroquinolones (e.g., ofloxacin) had limited activity against some respiratory pathogens, such as S. pneumoniae. However, more recent fluoroquinolone agents (so-called third-generation agents or the “respiratory fluoroquinolones”) are active against a broad spectrum of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, including atypical organisms.

Zagam (sparfloxacin) – fluoroquinolone antibiotic

Sparfloxacin is expected to be especially useful against penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae and multidrug-resistant H. influenzae and M. catarrhalis. Rhone-Poulenc Rorer is also studying the use of sparfloxacin for acute maxillary sinusitis, skin infection, and complicated urinary tract infection. In clinical trials, sparfloxacin (Zagam) was comparable to erythromycin and cefaclor for clearing community-acquired pneumonia.